Mainstreaming Disability in Humanitarian Response

Written By: Super User Category: News

The Disability Mainstreaming project by Kenya Red Cross Society and Christian Blind Mission (CBM) is one that is loaded with testimonies of transformation, a project that has changed the lives of primary school pupils, high school students, widows, couples, the youth, teachers and members of the community.

The Disability Mainstreaming project by Kenya Red Cross Society and Christian Blind Mission (CBM) is one that is loaded with testimonies of transformation, a project that has changed the lives of primary school pupils, high school students, widows, couples, the youth, teachers and members of the community.

In Baringo county, a baseline Survey on Mainstreaming Disability in Humanitarian Response was conducted in Tiaty Sub County to collect information and provide understanding of the potential pathways of mainstreaming disability in humanitarian response in a sustainable manner. Furthermore, the study aimed at contributing to the improvement of the quality of life of PWDs especially in prevention and response to humanitarian situations by building their resilience in targeted communities.

Speaking during the launch in Baringo county, Kevin Dudi, Programme Manager, CBM Kenya Country Office explained that CBM’s mission lies in the support of the inclusion and betterment of the lives of persons with disabilities across the globe through such partnerships.

“It is true that disability is not inability but instead, society has been pushing people living with disability to change and fit within that society, whereas we should be increasingly working with them to remove the barriers that hinder them from fully engaging in their daily life. It is our hope that the collaborative effort under the mainstreaming disability project in Baringo will benefit greatly from the results of this report and implement the recommendations supporting persons living with disabilities so that they too can contribute fully to the county agenda,” Mr. Dudi said.

The study sampled all the seven wards in Tiaty sub-county and a total of 403 households were interviewed (with 2004 family members), 14 key informant interviewed, and 8 focus group discussions conducted targeting households with PWDs, and elderly persons, county government, humanitarian actors and community members.

“Disability is not one’s choice, therefore, the Kenya Red Cross Society is working closely with the community and their leaders to ensure the people living with disabilities are not left behind. It is our duty as citizens of this country to ensure each one of us receives the support

needed. As an organization, we have so far supported the registration of 1,895 PWDs with the National Council of Persons so that they too can receive support from the government. This Exercise will continue in Tiaty so as to include older persons who are equally vulnerable,” Dr.

Abbas Gullet, Kenya Red Cross Secretary General noted.

The main results of the study indicate that the main types of disabilities are seeing, hearing, memory, mobility, self-care, and communication among all (2004) family members of the 403 contacted households. Moreover, about 63.5% and 30.3% of households in Tiaty sub county have PWDs, and elderly respectively.

“We are proud to be the first county in the whole country to map people with special needs. Through our strong partnership with the Kenya Red Cross, we have been able to continuously map our population, especially during disasters. As a county, we will walk the talk and ensure the report is adopted by the county assembly and that there is sufficient budgetary allocation to enable actualization of the recommendations in the report,” H.E. Stanley Kiptis, Governor, Baringo County affirmed.

The repot emphasizes on the critical importance for all the relevant stakeholders to effectively and efficiently collaborate, while establishing and promoting the adoption of key practical and policy implications that are well founded so as to enhance the success of disability mainstreaming strategies in Baringo County.

A similar project is being implemented in Bungoma county also striving to reduce stigma and discrimination and increase acceptance of PLWDs among members of the community as well as increase participation of PLWDs in school co-curricular and extra-curricular services where sensitization sessions are conducted to both teachers and students, which advocate for inclusive learning. More training is conducted for Community Health Volunteers and Community Health Assistants on disability inclusion.

The project successes are evident from the testimonials and implementation progress that continue to achieve the project goal and objectives.